Good Luck Foods For St. Patrick's Day

Is it St. Patrick’s Day yet?! Irish!

In all seriousness, St. Patrick’s Day is here. Whether you are of Irish descent or not, chances are you engage in some sort of Saint Paddy’s Day debaucheries, er, I mean, celebrations. The most notable tradition surrounding this day involves the concept of ‘good luck’. People often wear green for good luck. They go searching for prized four-leaf clovers and shamrocks, and even engage in other superstitions like eating Lucky Charms or drinking green beer to fuel the magical enchantments of this sacred day.

To save you the (rather unfortunate) tradition of eating sugar-dusted Lucky Charms for good luck once again this year, I have  gathered a list of food symbolic of good luck from all around the world. So, trade your cereal-sly pathetic bowl of Lucky Charms out for one of these healthy and hearty substitute.

Grapes- Grapes are grape for you. In Spain and Portugal, there is an age-old tradition where people eat 12 grapes to ring in the new year, with each grape symbolizing the luck of the months ahead. Wine will also do, since you know, it’s St. Paddy’s day after all.

 

Noodles- Many Asian countries consider eating long noodles as a way to bring forth a long life. Even if udon know how much of this superstition is true, you’ll still get a delicious meal out of it! If you live in the greater New York City area, check out Mamu Thai for great noodle selection. You can find their ever-moving truck with the Food Moves locator app.

 

Cabbage- Cabbage is associated with good luck and fortune because it resembles the color of money. It’s green color is a perfect complement to your St. Patty’s Day celebration! Of course, cabbage goes great with corned beef for a holiday tradition.

 

Fish- All around the world eating fish symbolizes prosperity, luck, and longevity. From catfish to salmon to tuna and tilapia, there is no shortage of fishy variety, and you can also eat them however you like. Throwing in a fish pun for the halibut.

 

Pomegranate- In Turkey, eating pomegranate denotes life and fertility. It’s red color symbolizes the heart and is also good for your heart.

 

Not sure where to pick up some of these items for  the big day? Check your Food Moves app to uncover the nearest farmers’ market to you. I’m sure there are an abundance of grapes, cabbage, and pomegranates at those farmers’ markets to fuel your good luck for the upcoming year. And as always, may the luck be with you.